Relative dating in archaeology

Based on a discipline of geology called stratigraphy, rock layers are used to decipher the sequence of historical geological events.

Relative techniques can determine the sequence of events but not the precise date of an event, making these methods unreliable.

Today, many different radioactive elements have been used, but the most famous absolute dating method is radiocarbon dating, which uses the isotope C.

This isotope, which can be found in organic materials and can be used only to date organic materials, has been incorrectly used by many to make dating assumptions for non-organic material such as stone buildings.

Stratigraphy is the oldest of the relative dating methods that archaeologists use to date things.

Stratigraphy is based on the law of superposition--like a layer cake, the lowest layers must have been formed first.

Archaeologists use many different techniques to determine the age of a particular artifact, site, or part of a site.

The basis for stratigraphy seems quite intuitive today, but its applications were no less than earth-shattering to archaeological theory.b) Absolute These methods are based on calculating the date of artefacts in a more precise way using different attributes of materials.This method includes carbon dating and thermoluminescence.When museums and collectors purchase archaeological items for their collections they enter an expensive and potentially deceptive commercial fine arts arena.Healthy profits are to be made from illicitly plundered ancient sites or selling skillfully made forgeries.

Leave a Reply